The Ticking Time Bomb of Child Poverty and Austerity

The UK is the sixth richest country in the world and yet more than one in four children is growing up in poverty today.

  • Child poverty damages childhoods. Growing up in poverty means being cold, going hungry, not owning belongings that others consider essential and not being able to join in activities with friends. It also impacts on health, educational outcomes and the overall experience of childhood.
  • Child poverty destroys life chances. Leaving school with few qualifications translates into lower earnings over the course of a working life. Poorer childhood health results in more complicated health histories over the course of a lifetime, again influencing earnings as well as overall life quality.
  • Child poverty imposes costs on broader society. Governments forgo prospective revenues and commit themselves to providing services in the future if they fail to address child poverty now.

Cross-national studies and evidence gathered over time show us that child poverty is not a natural phenomenon. Instead it is a political phenomenon – the product of choices and actions made by government and society.

Child Poverty damages children’s experiences of childhood and harms their future life chances. Research by Save the Children earlier this year highlights:

  • well over half of parents in poverty (61%) say they have cut back on food and over a quarter (26%) say they have skipped meals in the past year.
  • around 1 in 5 parents in poverty (19%) say their children have to go without new shoes when they need them.
  • a large number of children in poverty say they are missing out on things that many other children take for granted, such as going on school trips (19%) and having a warm coat in winter (14%).
  • only 1 in 5 parents in poverty (20%) say they have not had to borrow money to pay for essentials, such as food and clothes, in the past year.

A recent study by the Institute of Fiscal Studies (IFS) estimates that 800,000 more children will fall into poverty by 2020. That would be a rise in the child poverty rate from 19.9% to 24.4%. This will be the biggest increase in child poverty since the 1980’s, and would completely reverse the improvements made by during the last decade when 900,000 children were removed from poverty. The IFS figures are for children living in absolute poverty. Millions more children live in relative poverty.

As the govt’s spending cuts continue, so more and more families are at real risk of slipping into poverty, either from a reduction in tax credits, child benefit, the decision to uprate benefits in line with the consumer prices index rather than the retail prices index (which tends to show a higher annual inflation rate), the time limiting of employment and support allowance or from the loss of their jobs or stagnating wages. Poverty affects every aspect of a child’s life. 47% of children with asthma are from the poorest 10% of families, poor children are 5 times less likely to have access to a safe outdoor play area, 85% of children living in damp flats have breathing problems.

Austerity measures may also affect children in more subtle ways. There is another type of poverty, one that is more difficult to define and quantify, that of emotional poverty. As the unemployment rate soars, many households are experiencing joblessness for the first time. Children are far from immune from the negative effects of austerity. The additional stress levels, lack of funds and general loss of confidence experienced by parents and family members must impact upon children also. It has been proven that unemployment can become cyclical for generations of families. These children are feeling both the direct and indirect outcomes of unemployment and austerity measures likely affecting their own participation in the workplace in future years.

Children’s charity Unicef has published a report highlighting that child poverty rates within the UK are set to increase significantly, due to government spending cuts. There is recognition that child poverty is one of the most crucial indicators for measuring successful social cohesion, a marker of wellbeing and future prosperity of any given nation. Long-term effects of child poverty include: issues in education, employment, mental and physical health problems and difficulties with social interaction. The standard of living encountered during a person’s childhood is recognized as being instrumental in shaping their future.

Unicef warns that during times of economic recession, children can “drop off the policy agenda” in the scramble to effect immediate change, all planning for future generations is perceived as of secondary importance. This is highly problematic, not only because future planning is negated in favour of a short term outlook, but because a child’s current living situation is under escalated risk during times of financial crisis. Children, as one of the most vulnerable groups of people, cannot be left out of the equation especially in times of financial recession.

This government has proposed changes to child benefit; however, major inconsistencies regarding financial eligibility led to strong opposition and initial proposals were re-drafted highlighting the governments’ incompetence in making basic calculations. The Child Poverty Action Group has already warned that the proposed cuts to child benefit will have an adverse effect on children’s wellbeing. They questioned the moral issue of using children as a battlefield for austerity.

Austerity measures are proving a complete failure, exacerbating the problems of unemployment and thereby increasing levels of child poverty. State-direction job creation, along with relevant supporting policies, is the route to success in lowering the rate of child poverty in the UK. The ‘Lost Generation’ will not just be those currently leaving school to no jobs and no higher and further education places, but the generation before them who are too young to be aware of their disappearing future. To put the brakes on this depressing picture we need to end the madness of austerity Britain. The Children’s Society have said: “It would be a grave injustice if we allowed the burden of the current economic turmoil to fall on the shoulders of disadvantaged children.”

Child Poverty in Britain, £10 Billion To Be Cut From Welfare (RT news report Oct 2012)

End Child Poverty, a coalition of more than 150 charities, welfare organisations, social justice groups and unions has published a report and interactive map detailing the level of child poverty in each constituency, local authority and ward in the UK. The campaign predicts that, as benefits start to fall in real terms later this year, the proportion of children living in poverty will increase significantly.

Commenting on the figures, Enver Solomon, Chair of the End Child Poverty campaign said:

“The child poverty map reveals the depth and breadth of child poverty across the country showing the gross levels of inequality that children face in every region. Far too many children whose parents are struggling to make a living have to go hungry and miss out on the essentials of a decent childhood that all young people should be entitled to.

The huge disparities that exist across the country have become more entrenched and are now an enduring reality as many more children are set to become trapped in long term poverty and disadvantage.

Local authorities have to deal with reduced budgets but they have critical decisions to make. We’re calling on authorities to prioritise low income families in the decisions they make about local welfare spending, including spending on the new council tax benefit, and on protecting families hit by the bedroom tax. This week we have written to local authority leaders in the local authorities with the most child poverty, asking them what they will do to tackle child poverty in their local area.”

The government must also closely examine its current strategy for reducing poverty and consider what more it could do to ensure millions of children’s lives are not blighted by the corrosive impact that poverty has on their daily existence.’’

cpag dorset

Within the local Boroughs in our area, there is a very contrasting picture from ward to ward. In Bournemouth, 33% of children within Kinson South are living in poverty whilst in Littledown and Iford the figure is 8%. In the Poole Town ward, within Alderney it is 30% whilst in Broadstone it is below 5%. Click here for the full percentage breakdown for all wards within Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch. Excel spreadsheets detailing percentage figures for all South West local authorities can be viewed and downloaded by clicking here.

From April 2013, local authorities will have significantly increased discretion over the allocation of financial support for families, although in circumstances in which this support has been dramatically reduced. Local Authorities will be responsible for:

  • Providing support with the cost of essential items such as replacing cookers or fridges for families on a low income, as the Social Fund is replaced by schemes run by local authorities.
  • Deciding who receives help with paying Council Tax, as Council Tax Benefit is replaced with local assistance schemes. The Resolution Foundation has found that low income families will see their council tax rise by up to £600 a year as a result of this change.
  • Deciding who should receive support with housing costs. April 2013 will see the introduction of the £500 a week benefit cap and the bedroom tax for families who live in social housing if the government believes they have a spare bedroom.
  • Local Authorities have been allocated control over Discretionary Housing Payments, which they can use to help make up rent shortfalls for a small proportion of families affected by these changes.

End Child Poverty believes that Local Authorities should take a strategic decision to protect the poorest families with children when allocating these resources. Local Authorities have not imposed these cuts but, with the removal of ringfencing, they will have a significant influence over how they affect local residents.

If you would like to become involved in BPACC campaigns about this issue or any other, please Contact Us by email to info@bpacc.co.uk

Sources:
End Child Poverty Report – Child Poverty Map of the UK
Child Poverty in the UK – CPAG
Child poverty: a generation sacrificed to austerity – Counterfire
Austerity increases child poverty, report confirms – ISG
UK’s Poorest Families hit Hardest by Recession and Austerity – The Real News
Poverty map shows how cuts in benefits will hurt children – Guardian

Videos from the Benefits Justice Summit 9th March 2013, London

The start of Benefits Justice Summit

Winvisible

Mental Health Network

Using the law to fight the cuts – Wendy Pettifer (1 of 2)

Using the law to fight the cuts – Wendy Pettifer (2 of 2)

Using the law to fight the cuts – Liz Davies (1 of 2)

Using the law to fight the cuts – Liz Davies (2 of 2)

Closing session – Action plan

Building campaigns locally (1 of 2)

Building campaigns locally (2 of 2)

Tenants Federation

Food & Allied Workers Union

Pensioners Association

Single Mother’s Self-Defence

defend council housingdpac

right to work

Benefit Justice Summit – Saturday 9th March – ULU London

The Campaign for Benefit Justice is uniting all those opposed to devastating benefit cuts. By linking up we can challenge the Government’s divide and rule tactics and unite the 99% of people hit by these cuts. This summit will bring together disabled people, tenants, unemployed , trade unions, students, pensioners, single parents, and others to oppose benefit cuts.

The venue is fully-accessible for wheelchair users – for other access needs, please contact benefitjustice@gmail.com

benefit-justice-summit page 1 - 550
benefit-justice-summit page 2 - 550
Click here to download PDF of above

Click here to book your place on the Summit being held on Saturday 9th March at University of London Union (ULU), Malet St, London WC1E 7HY at 11am.

Cut rents, not benefits
Can’t pay, won’t pay
Can’t move, won’t move

Get Involved

If you’d like to get involved in the Benefit Justice Campaign, they would be glad to have your support.

  • Contact trades unions, tenants and community organisations to invite them to our Summit on the 9th March 2013.
  • Add your name to the Benefits Justice Statement
  • Ask local organisations to send a speaker to the Summit
  • Create a local Benefit Justice network, and keep us abreast of your activities by emailing us at benefitjustice@gmail.com.
  • Support the protests in London and across the country on 20th March 2013.

Our Open Letter to the Guardian Published on the 12th February, 2013

Cuts in benefit are an unjust attack on the poor and they must stop. People are already being driven into debt, hunger and homelessness. From April millions more will be hit by the bedroom tax, cuts in council-tax benefit, ending disability living allowance and further vicious cuts. In one of the richest countries in the world, the rise of food banks, destitution and poverty is not acceptable. People receiving benefits did not cause the banking and economic crisis and we do not accept them being scapegoated to pay for it.

The Campaign for Benefit Justice has called a summit event on 9 March in central London, bringing together tenants, disabled people, trade unions, the unpaid and the low paid as one national voice to end the war on the poor. All who support us should contact Benefit Justice via info@defendouncilhousing.org.uk or mail@dpac.uk.net [or benefitjustice@gmail.com]. Collecting unpaid corporate tax, capping private rents, insulating, repairing and “greening” homes, and building 100,000 first-class council homes would be a sane and just way to raise funds, build for growth and cut bills and rents.

Signed:
Eileen Short, Chair of Defend Council Housing
Linda Burnip, Disabled People Against Cuts
Michael Bradley, Right to Work Campaign
Len McCluskey, General Secretary of UNITE the Union
Mark Serwotka, General Secretary of the PCS Union
Dave Anderson MP
John McDonnell MP
Austin Mitchell MP
Caroline Lucas MP
Jane Aitchison (PCS), Joint Secretary of Unite the Resistance
Richard Buckwell, Chair of Ashfield UNISON Branch & East Midlands member of UNISON’s National Housing Forum
Glyn Robbins, UNITE member
Dot Gibson, General Secretary of the National Pensioners Convention
Claire Glasman, WinVisible (Women with Visible and Invisible Disabilities)
Kim Sparrow, Single Mothers’ Self-Defence
John Davies, Leeds Hands off our Homes
Dr Stuart Hodkinson, Lecturer at the School of Geography, University of Leeds
Shirley Frost, Sheffield Defend Council Housing, Campaign for Benefits Justice, and UNITE Community Members branch Sheffield
Imelda Messenger, Hackney tenant, Street Properties

defend council housingdpac

right to work

Should Bournemouth Borough Council release more of its mountain of financial reserves?

Bournemouth Borough Council has announced that it will release £23M of its financial reserves to “safeguard services and invest in a variety of schemes” and also “lower council tax by 0.7 per cent to ensure residents will not have to pay any extra this year”. Only time will tell whether the funds being released will actually help the people who are directly suffering under the savage austerity measures being implemented by the government.

Of course any help that the council can offer to relieve the pressure being felt by hard pressed residents within our area is welcome. However, BPACC calls on the council to look at using the abundance of their reserves still left – around £70M – to plug the hole in government funding for charities and support groups, art and community services, road maintenance, subsidised bus routes and services, renovation of school buildings, legal aid, short break or respite care services, disability services such as mobility shops, stopping increases to car parking charges, social care / community transport etc etc etc….

The Council also needs to answer the question why council tax reserves were not made available for the many cuts we have already seen such as the closures of Darracott Day, Malvern, Horizons day care centres or staff cuts at Boscombe day care centre and more recently the proposed closure of Dorset Enterprise.

And lest we forget the cuts / freezes to the wages of many workers employed directly by the council. It can reasonably be argued that as Bournemouth Borough Council is a major employer in the town, cutting or freezing wages or giving below inflation pay increases will have a direct negative effect on the local economy simply because people will be forced to spend less of their earnings within the local community. On top of this, the council has chosen to make hundreds of their employees redundant which has the same effect to the local economy and additionally, due to the unemployment crisis, many of these people will now be in receipt of state benefits and of course no longer paying taxes. A double whammy false economy which although may have a short term positive effect on the council budget sheets, will have long term negative effects upon the local and national economy.

In April 2013, due to the Welfare Reform Act, people will see radical changes to some state benefits:

Bedroom Tax – anyone of working age in receipt of Housing Benefit (HB) who live in Council housing with “spare” bedrooms, will not receive HB for these rooms. This will mean these people will see their HB reduced as shown below and they will be expected to cover the shortfall in their rent out of their JSA – Jobseekers Allowance, ESA – Employment Support Allowance, Working Tax Credits or Child Tax Credits:

  • 14% reduction in Housing Benefit for under-occupancy by one bedroom
  • 25% reduction in Housing benefit for under-occupancy by two bedrooms or more

Council Tax Benefit (CTB) – the government has cut the funding to Local Authorities for the provision of CTB by 10%. It has been left entirely up to local Councils how they cover this budget cut. Bournemouth Council has decided that people of working age, except those on DLA – Disability Living Allowance and some Carers, who receive CTB will pay up 20% of their total bill.

Crisis / Social Fund Loans and Community Care Grants – the govt has localised these loans / grants and the decision making process of delivering them to some of the most vulnerable people in our community is being handed over to the Council. The funding Local Authorities receive from government will not be ring-fenced, nor will there be a ‘statutory duty’ on local authorities to provide a minimum level of service, nor will there be any ‘sanctions’ if a local authority uses the money to plough into other services. Due to cuts they have already faced, Council staff are already under severe workload pressure and it is highly debatable whether more staff will be employed, so it is very likely that this service will be outsourced. Most people are now becoming aware of the problems this can cause with likes of Mouchel, A4E, G4S, ATOS, Working Links who are happy to take taxpayers money but either unwilling or unable to provide sufficient quality of service or value for money. And as with many other things that are happening, if this service is outsourced, it can be legitimately viewed as back-door privatisation of Jobcentres.

Many local public services have already seen their funding from the Council cut and it will be difficult to gauge the effects of these cuts for several years. In most cases, thorough impact assessments have not taken place. As with most policies of this government a hurried swinging axe has fallen down without taking into account the long term hardship and misery it will cause members of our community and the effects it will have on the local / national economy. The govt has set the precedent and unfortunately most Councils are following suit in the way the cuts are being delivered. In most cases the cuts will not ‘help the economy’, in fact they will have the opposite effect and stifle growth causing the country’s economy to continue to flat-line and even that might be considered optimistic. Triple dip recession just around the corner?

It could be argued that the Council are caught between a rock and a hard place, as on the one hand they are having their funding cut by central government who conveniently devolve responsible to local authorities as to how the cuts are implemented and have also removed most of the ring-fencing of budgets which gives local authorities free reign regarding services they choose to cut. On the other hand, of course, the Council will not be able to please all the people all the time. However the question begs, how vociferously are our Councils relaying their frustration and anger about the savage nature of these cuts back to central govt or is it more the case that once you scratch the surface of any rhetoric of objection they are happy to go along with the tory ideology of systematically destroying the safety /support network of many within our community.

Over the last couple of years, prior to the Council announcing which services will be facing the axe, residents have been asked ‘which services would you like to see cut’. However at a time when they were sitting on around £100M of local taxpayers money (now £70M), perhaps the question the Council should have, and should now be asking, is ‘which services that have already faced budgets cut would you like to see have their funding re-instated’.

If you live within Bournemouth Borough and would like to raise any of these issues with your local Councillors, all wards and contact details are shown here. Remember Councillors are elected by you, to serve you; not to blindly follow the decisions or ideology of whichever politically party they have chosen to align themselves with.

Specific information about budgets (and funding cuts) allocated to individual organisations is difficult to come by; even via FOIs (Freedom of Information requests). If you are aware of charities or support groups whose budgets have been cut over the last 3 years, please email us at info@bpacc.co.uk and we will look into the matter further. All information received will be treated in the strictest confidence.

Sources for this post:
Bournemouth freezing council tax by releasing £23m of reserves – Bournemouth Echo
Local Cuts and Closures – BPACC
New council tax reduction scheme aims to protect Bournemouth’s most needy – Bournemouth Echo
Social Housing Size Restriction – Bournemouth Council
Local Council Tax Support Scheme FAQ – Bournemouth Council
Is this the end of the Social Fund in local communities? – Community Links

Right, that’s enough, now what are we going to do about it?

People’s Assembly: Saturday 22 June 2013, 9:30am – 5pm, Central Hall Westminster, Storey’s Gate, London, Westminster, London SW1H 9NH

Click on photo to add your support

Click on photo to add your support

The following has been republished from Coalition of Resistance, posted originally on Mark Steels blog and in the Independent

I genuinely hope that George Osborne does it on purpose. That he descends from the podium after a speech and sniggers to Cameron “I said ‘We’re all in it together’ again. Haaa haaaa, I don’t know how I get away with it?”

He continues to use this slogan, this son of a 17th baronet, worth £4 million and heir to many millions more, as he explains the necessity of cutting public services, libraries, pensions as well as payments to the poor, the disabled, and those who will never inherit a single baronetcy, no matter how hard they train for it.

The crisis we’re all apparently joined in – it’s generally agreed – was caused by the failures, greed and recklessness of a clique we call, for short, ‘the bankers’

Yet the people having to pay for their chaos are not the bankers. They’re the disabled and the homeless, the firefighters and lollipop ladies and anyone who depends on them. Maybe George Osborne believes these were the culprits, that it was lollipop ladies telling kids “Wait by the road a minute, love, I’m just loaning ten million quid on the basis that property values are certain to double every six months forever, and awarding myself half a million as a bonus. Right, now that’s done we’re safe to cross.”

For the poor to pay a major contribution towards the crisis created by the bankers would be a screaming injustice, but it’s so much worse than that. Because one of the few professions that doesn’t have to cough up is the bankers themselves. And to ease their pain of watching everyone apart from themselves suffer, one of the few measures taken by this government that gives more money away rather than less has been a tax cut for the richest one per cent.

There are many consequences of this, among them the fact that many people in Britain now express their feelings about economics with a theory that goes, more or less, “Aaaaaaagh.” Sometimes they go into more detail, adding “The BASTARDS.” And then “Aaaaaaaagh.”

But the coalition’s outrages are only part of the frustration felt by so many. Because there can hardly have been a time when so many people, disgusted by their government, have been at such a loss as to what we can do about it.

Until recently, many people found a home for their anger at social injustice in the Labour Party. But the New Labour years, if we’re being harsh, weren’t all that successful at promoting peace and equality. Although there are Labour members who are wonderfully effective, such as Tony Benn and Owen Jones, many of their activists left or became disillusioned.

Left wing groups have collapsed more spectacularly, in a series of crises that makes you wonder whether their activities are organised by the scriptwriters of Eastenders, leaving another layer of socialists and campaigners in confusion.

But another piece of this jigsaw of frustration is that the basis for an opposition is evident. The government is by no means overwhelmingly popular, and the Lib-Dem part of it widely held in contempt. Anyone who watches Question Time knows the easiest way for a panellist to win a round of applause is to make an angry speech about greedy bankers. When a few hundred activists moved into tents under the ‘Occupy’ banner, they won the sympathy of millions and forced ministers to appear on the news making unconvincing attempts to justify their actions.

When an opposition has appeared credible, it has won an astounding level of support – such as when George Galloway won the election in Bradford, or when Caroline Lucas was victorious in Brighton for the Green Party. Campaigns such as the one in Lewisham to prevent the closure of the A&E department at the hospital have amassed tens of thousands of supporters. But for the most part these moments remain in one area, or pass quickly, then it’s back to yelling at the telly, or if you’re really dedicated, the radio as well.

Would it be possible, I find myself thinking, to bring together those who share these frustrations, to connect with each other?

Some people are already in groups or parties, such as UK Uncut, the Greens or Labour, but I’m sure they’d acknowledge there are many people beyond their own supporters who’d be willing to contribute towards a squabble with George Osborne.

It might be tempting to consider these thoughts, then conclude you’d done your bit by thinking them, and if you wanted to do any more you could occasionally arrange them into a moan. But it seems – since enough people are thinking this way at once – that a genuine movement is possible.

For example Owen Jones, one of the most eloquent opponents of the Coalition’s austerity, is eager to help set up such a network. Salma Yaqoob, who many will know as an inspiring opponent of the war in Iraq, is another. Caroline Lucas, the Green MP, feels the same, as does Laurie Penny, the journalist who wrote powerfully as part of the Occupy movement.

The trade unions are committed to establishing this network, which can link the campaigns, the meetings, the petitions and the squeals of anguish that try to prevent the cruelties of austerity. Almost every major union has pledged to back such a movement, which it will call a ‘People’s Assembly’.

And crucially, many of this large and growingly frustrated TV-abusing section of society have greeted the idea with enthusiasm, and even a hint of optimism. For example a single letter in a newspaper announcing the Assembly attracted hundreds of initial supporters. So this is the plan.

Within the next few weeks a series of gatherings in the biggest cities in Britain will take place to launch the Assembly in each area. From there groups can be set up that will discuss ways to oppose the barrage of attacks coming from the coalition, leading to a People’s Assembly on June 22 in London. You can register for that day here

Many possibilities can open up once the connections are made. A group in one part of the country can discuss how to support a campaign to defend a hospital in another part. Even a joint letter to a local newspaper is an improvement on a lonely individual seethe.

It will be a network that embraces supporters of different groups and parties, as well as those with no affiliations. And it will bring together enough people eager to participate, who would rather do something than nothing, who would rather find themselves alongside others who agree than remain on their own.

The evidence suggests that wherever a community unites and campaigns to defend its hospitals, its libraries, it parks and its people, it succeeds at least in part. The aim of the People’s Assembly will be simply to tap into the vast amount of humanity, imagination and wit of those who wish to curtail the injustices swirling around us, and create a place that we all feel better for being in, and all feel better for having helped to create.

That’s all.

And you can carry on swearing at George Osborne on the telly as well if you like.

So leave a name or a message if you’re interested and we can add it to the many who have already said they are, and to show I’m fair, I’ll even let you leave a name and a message if you’re not interested and think I’m completely round the sodding bend.

Food poverty in breadline Britain

There has been rapid expansion in food banks over the past two years triggered by growing numbers of people unable to feed themselves or their families as a result of rising living costs, shrinking incomes and welfare benefit cuts. This ever increasing need for food banks is a damning indictment of this government’s failed economic approach.

The boom in Britain’s food banks reflects a number of worrying and complicated trends. As well as rising unemployment, more people are seeing their pay frozen and hours cut at work. For the past couple of years, charities have been warning that a shift to a less generous way of uprating benefits in line with inflation, combined with rising food and fuel prices, would make life more difficult for people claiming benefits. Then there is the start of a new, harsher benefits regime, a result of which will be more claimants having their payments sanctioned – cut or stopped entirely – if they miss appointments. At the same time, the state system of a social fund and crisis loans is being wound down, so emergency cash payments from the welfare system for those deemed to be in extreme need are now exceptionally difficult to procure.

The government spent £230m on crisis loans in 2009-10. But under the Welfare Reform Act, responsibility for administering this spending will be devolved to 150 English councils. Local authorities are preparing to invest in charity-run food banks to cope with an expected deluge in demand for crisis help from low income families hit by welfare cuts, raising the spectre of depression-era US “breadlines”. However they will be sharing a pot of money set at 2005 budget levels – which could be less than half the 2009-10 figure, so would obviously seem to be inadequate at best and this money will not be ring fenced – meaning that councils can spend some or all of it on other services if they wish.

Cuts next year to the social fund, which provides emergency aid to vulnerable people, mean that from April 2013 many councils will no longer be able to provide cash help to applicants. Instead they will offer “in kind” support such as referring clients to food banks and issuing electronic food vouchers.

It is very unlikely that plans to refer crisis loan applicants to food banks will solve the problems, let alone the root cause. Experts say the experience of food poverty in the US and Canada, where charity food assistance has become a significant element of the welfare system, shows that while food banks are popular with volunteers and, however well meaning their aims and intentions are, they can be inefficient, unreliable and fail to address the underlying causes of food poverty, such as low pay.

Liz Dowler, professor of food and social policy at the University of Warwick, said: “Despite their apparent ‘win-win’ appeal to some councils, food banks conceal realities of poverty and hunger. They let the state off the hook from their obligation to ensure all have the means to live, and from showing political leadership to grapple creatively with poverty.”

Everything is pointing towards the fact that this country is on the precipice of a food poverty crisis. A spokesman for the Child Poverty Action Group said: “It’s clear that this is an early-warning indicator of how bad things are starting to get for poorer families and how bad things are going to get in future. This should be setting alarm bells ringing for the government.”

Alas, those in power, seem to have placed mufflers on those bells with government ministers regarding food banks as exemplars of the “big society” approach to social problems and many Conservative-run local authorities welcoming the move to provide local crisis assistance, which ministers say go “to the heart of localism and the big society agenda.”

The government’s complacency towards food poverty will most probably become more exasperating by inflation hitting its lowest level in nearly three years in September. Experts predict that soaring energy bills and rising food and petrol costs will send inflation back up again in the coming months, ramping up the pressure on households. And the situation is further compounded by the damage wreaked by the dismal summer of 2012 on UK harvests that will inevitably push food prices up further. In these austere times, with food banks feeding the hungry, that is going to hurt. Prof Richard Tiffin, director of the Centre for Food Security at University of Reading. “It should be a major warning that climate change is increasingly having a global impact on the food supply. If the problems in Russia, the UK and the US this year were combined with a failure of the Indian monsoon, we could see a major global food crisis that would have an enormous impact on food prices and badly affect poor people in the UK and around the world.”

Trussell Trust is a charity that provides three days’ worth of emergency food to people in the UK who are at crisis point and currently receive government funding. Trussell said it had been approached by the Welsh government and a number of local authorities in London to discuss “deliverable and practical” emergency food assistance part-funded by the social fund.

The trust has said it does not object to taking state funding in principle but its food banks were already helping thousands of people referred to them by councils and welfare advisors after being turned down for crisis loans. Chris Mould, director of Trussell Trust, said the move could be risky for the charity, which was not designed to provide large scale welfare assistance. He was also concerned that the public would be less likely to give food if the trust was seen to be delivering a service regarded as the responsibility of the state.

The trust have also warned that the string of energy price hikes announced by providers recently could mean more people turning to it for help. Chris Mould said: “Every day we meet parents who are skipping meals to feed their children or even considering stealing to stop their children going to bed hungry. It is shocking that there is such a great need for food banks in 21st-century Britain, but the need is growing.”

Along with Trussell Trust there are many other charities and volunteer services that provide food bank services. Some have seen a 100% increase in the numbers of people coming to them for a free or cheap, meal. Four out of 10 charities said their budgets had been slashed as a result of funding cuts. Around a third said these cuts have made it harder for them to provide meals, and one in six said they may have to abandon providing food altogether.

FareShare, a charity that supplies millions of free meals to charities, food banks and breakfast clubs using food donated by supermarkets, said it could not keep pace with demand. They said the food it distributed in 2011-12 contributed to more than 8.6m meals, benefiting an average 36,500 people a day via 720 organisations that deal with people in food poverty. Its long-term plans are to triple the numbers of people and charities it supplies.

Lindsay Boswell, chief executive of FareShare said: “Every piece of evidence we have got is that demand will only increase over time as more people lose their jobs and living costs go up. Even if the economy improves there will be a considerable lag before that trickles through to individuals who use the services the charities support. We are forecasting that we will see growth for at least the next five years.”

The Salvation Army, whose churches issue food parcels on an informal basis, said its biggest distribution point, in Keighley, West Yorkshire, was so inundated this year it had to temporarily restrict food parcels to people referred by local charities and health professionals.

Along with charity shops and payday loans companies, food banks have become one of recession Britain’s high growth sectors. Originally set up to support homeless individuals, food banks report they increasingly serve families hit by benefit cuts or unemployment, and low-income working households who can’t make ends meet.

Food banks are thriving not just in Britain’s most deprived areas but in some of its wealthiest areas, like Poole. Our seaside town boasts some of Britain’s most expensive properties but in April 2012 a local food bank supplied food parcels to nearly 300 people – more than twice as many as in April 2010, with the extra demand driven by low income working families. Poole food bank manager Lorraine Russell said that: “Before, the primary reason (for needing food parcels) was benefit cuts or delays, but now that’s been overtaken by people on low incomes. We used to get very few low-income people, but now that has taken over.”

Even though food banks can provide a little low-level nutrition in a crisis for three days, they were never designed to cope with months of malnutrition due to inadequate levels of income or benefits. No guidance about financial need will be issued by the Department for Communities and Local Government, whose ministers, along with every member of the cabinet, have abdicated the primary moral duty of a civilised government for ensuring their poorest fellow citizens have enough income to buy a healthy diet. This damages the economy; it creates massive costs for the health service and lost time at work. Nutritionists frequently remind us that Britain was better fed from 1940 to 1945, a time of war and far greater economic crisis than the present.

Through international treaties, the UK government is already committed to ensure an adequate standard of living. They have a responsibility to provide resources so people have a minimum threshold of food, clothing, shelter and social security. However, with all the funding cuts to public services and the Welfare State, it is abundantly clear that they have no intention of fulfilling this obligation. So we, the people, have to draw a line, stand up against the food poverty injustice – along with all the other issues – and demand an end to the cuts.

KEEP ON KEEPING ON

RESIST – PROTEST – STRIKE

Sources:
Where in the UK do people rely most heavily on food banks? – Guardian
Breadline Britain: councils fund food banks to plug holes in welfare state – Guardian
Demand for food parcels explodes as welfare cuts and falling pay hit home – Guardian
Foodbank: our biggest client group now is people on low incomes – False Economy
Food banks are a symptom of failure – Guardian
Food banks: a life on handouts
Charity food banks serving record numbers – Guardian
Rising food prices are climate change’s first tangible bite into UK lives – Guardian
Lobster bisque at the soup kitchen: how a charity is redistributing food – Guardian
House of Commons – Oral Answers to Questions – Work and Pensions – Monday 23 January 2012 – Hansard

Twenty Ten March – A Poem

A poem by Zita Holbourne for Oct20. Copyright 2012 (via Make the March). Zita is a member of PCS NEC, Co-founder of Black Activists Rising Against Cuts, a poet and artist. More of her work can be viewed on Facebook ‘Zita Holbourne, Poet, Artist’

Over one million young people unemployed
Their dreams and aspirations destroyed
EMA slashed, tuition fees tripled
Attack upon attack on the disabled
68 is too late – pensions stolen
Rising cost of living whilst pay’s frozen
Libraries, youth centres, advice centres shut
Communities deprived as funding is cut
Poverty rising, inequality deepening

Stress, depression, sorrow increasing
We are the majority, we need to unite
Organise, mobilise, resist and fight
Be strong, determined, Rise Up as one
March on 20/10 and Keep on Keeping On
Neighbours, colleagues, friends and families
Trade Unions, Trades Councils and Communities
Anti cuts groups, campaigners and workers
Unemployed, students and pensioners
Adult and child, younger and older
Side by side, shoulder to shoulder
Both public and private sector
Stronger when we’re together
In Belfast, Glasgow and London
We’ll be marching, marching on

Against austerity
Against inequality
Against hypocrisy
Against poverty
On 20th October
We’ll be marching for our future

© Zita Holbourne

Stop the cuts to Council Tax benefit

Please sign and share the BPACC petition opposing the cut in funding for Council Tax benefit. Click here for more details about the changes

We, the residents of Poole / Bournemouth, deplore the government’s decision to cut the funding given to local authorities for Council Tax Benefit by 10%. We call on our council, Borough of Poole / Bournemouth Borough Council, to express their disapproval to central govt in the strongest terms possible. As an interim measure, we also call on our Council to cover this funding cut for 2013/14 out of the financial reserves in order to protect the most vulnerable members of our community from this additional charge.



Download printable paper based petition (Poole)
Download printable paper based petition (Bournemouth)

Thank-you for your support

Solidarity evening

A solidarity evening was held at the British Legion in Boscombe on Friday 28th September with food and a background ambience of soul and ska.

Guest speakers included Gareth Drinkwater (Unison) who gave an update about the SW NHS Pay Cartel and spoke about the leaked document which clearly showed their intentions were to reduce the Trusts’ wage bill from 68% of their overall budget to 60%. Click here more info about the cartel’s proposals.

James Meadway (Coalition of Resistance) explained how the govt’s programme of austerity and their refusal to move away from these policies was sending the country spiralling downwards into a deeper, longer recession akin to the 1930s. James also pointed out the great myth that is constantly peddled that the Public Sector is somehow responsible for the economic crisis. The fact is, public spending prior to 2008 by the previous Labour govt was 39% of GDP, under Major’s tory govt from 1991-97 is what 40% and during the Thatcher years of 1979-91 it was 41%. So the reality is, public sector govt spending was at it’s lowest for nearly 2 decades. This all changed following the collapse of Lehmans in the States, the domino effect it created to banks worldwide and the subsequent bail-outs that followed; including the £1.3 trillion bail-out by our govt to rescue UK banks. He also stressed the importance of everyone opposed to austerity to attend the mass demonstration in London on Oct 20th.

Neil Duncan-Jordan (Chair – BCP Trades Council) stated that, so far, the country has only seen a small chunk of the cuts and seemed oblivious to the fact that a further 80% was still to be implemented. So however bad it seems at the moment, things will only get much, much worse.

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How did we get here – New Economics Foundation

The UK has slid back into double-dip recession and Eurozone unemployment has hit new highs. Uncertainty stalks China, Brazil and other rising economies. We may be heading for a global recession.

Politicians call for austerity and little else. But spending cuts are economically illiterate. They wreck weak economies by locking them into a cycle explained by John Maynard Keynes over 80 years ago:

  • Cuts mean job losses and falling demand for goods and services.
  • Falling demand means firms sell less.
  • Firms selling cause wages to fall and unemployment to rise even more.
  • Demand for goods and services falls further.
  • Then, as demand collapses and economies shrink, debts become unpayable.

Breaking this vicious circle is the first step towards recovery. But we can’t return to the old world of chronic dependence on carbon and debt. Click here to view a short guide to how the crisis broke, and some ideas on how to get out of it.

Day Care Public Consultation Meetings

Bournemouth has already lost 2 day centres, causing the most vulnerable in society to suffer. Day Care Services review consultation meetings are taking place in the wider area, please attend and voice your concerns, where possible.

Click here for a full list of meetings taking place in June and early July.

UPDATE: On Monday 19th June, The Echo ran a story under the headline “Dorset day centre users asked to give views on cost-cutting ideas”. Click here to read full story