Child Poverty Action Group Monthly News and Views

Shown below is the “News from CPAG – Child Poverty Action Group e-newsletter, a monthly round-up of our news and views”. If you would like to subscribe to CPAG news, please click here.

IFS: major surge in child poverty by 2020

The Institute for Fiscal Studies has predicted that relative child poverty will go up by a staggering 1.1 million children in the current decade, almost entirely due to tax and benefit changes introduced by the coalition government. Our response calling for a complete rethink of government strategy on child poverty was widely quoted by the media including the Daily Mirror, Evening Standard and Guardian.

Alison Garnham has blogged on why we must not abandon the child poverty targets and why making progress on poverty requires us to rethink public spending across the whole of government so that we get the fundamentals right – a fairer society and a stronger economy.

Universal Credit – will it work?

Our *new report published with the TUC looks at whether universal credit can deliver its objectives, and in particular whether it can ‘make work pay’. For a summary of the report findings see Alison Garnham’s blog for Liberal Democrat Voice.

Many thanks to the Orp Foundation for supporting our Universal Credit work programme.

Welfare rights conference 2013: Surviving Welfare Reform

We are now hosting our annual Welfare Rights Conference in both the north and south of the country. We hope this will give more people the opportunity to attend, keeping travel and accommodation costs to a minimum.

  • The Northern Conference in Manchester on Thursday 5 September.
  • The Southern Conference in London on Wednesday 11 September.
  • Further information and booking

Special offer – book your place before 1 July for an early bird discount.

Exhibition space: if you are interested in exhibiting your work, products and services at our conference, contact Naomi Jessop (njessop@cpag.org.uk).

Training note: our Universal Credit and Personal Independence Payment courses across the UK are selling fast, book your place now to avoid disappointment! Visit our website to find dates in Norwich, Plymouth, York, Liverpool, Newcastle, Manchester and Cardiff.

Conference: Tackling child poverty in your local authority

On Thursday 18 July, CPAG is hosting a free conference in Birmingham, supported by the Barrow Cadbury Trust, exploring ways local authorities and their partners can creatively work to meet their commitments under the Child Poverty Act despite facing significant financial challenges.

Topics to be addressed on the day have emerged from discussions with local authorities and will include workshops on Universal Credit, Social Fund schemes, and including the voices of children and young people in child poverty strategies.

Further information and booking

A new partnership with the Chartered Institute of Housing

We are delighted to be the chosen charity for CIH’s Presidential Appeal. It’s a welcome opportunity for us to partner with a great organisation with shared goals.

For anyone going to the Housing 2013 conference in June, come and see us on the CPAG exhibition stand!

See a full list of our other upcoming events.

CPAG: the movie

We are the lucky winners of a VoiceOver video donated by politics.co.uk. See their inside view of filming a CPAG campaign video on location. We’ll let you know when the final video is launched!

The latest Understanding Society report indicates that while the public endorses the importance of reducing child poverty, there is also a hardening of attitudes towards the welfare state and benefit claimants. Our new campaign video aims to counter the common stereotypes.

Do you know a great campaigner?

Are you speaking out and taking action on issues that matter? Or does this sound like someone you know? Apply or nominate now for an SMK Campaigner Award, which equips people to become more effective campaigners. It’s free to apply. For more information, or to apply or nominate, please visit: the Sheila McKechnie Foundation. Applications close at 1pm on 10 June 2013.

cpag banner

Warning Signs

Reproduced with kind permission from TUC – Warning Signs

The warning signs have been there for some time. Last month one poll showed that the general public has lost confidence in politics providing solutions to the failing economy. More recently opinion polling showed antipathy to all things Europe, amplified by anxieties about a contagion of struggling EU economies.

This anti-politic dynamic gains traction from the Coalition dogma that there is ‘no alternative’ to the course they are plotting; that austerity is the natural and only response to the fiscal and monetarist challenges exerted on the global economy. It’s easier, their theory goes, for the social and economic devastation inflicted by their undiluted assault on public spending and public services to remain unchallenged if we believe it is ‘out of their hands’ and they have no choice.

One side-effect of this deliberate denial of culpability, this refusal to accept ownership of or responsibility for the outcomes of their choices as a government, is a diminishing faith in politics and politicians being seen as part of the solution. The consequence of that is democratic fracture and an increasing tendency to withdraw support for mainstream political parties – either through not voting at all or, as was demonstrated last week, by voting for what is essentially a protest party that says ‘no’ to many things, but not much about anything else, a party that stands on a platform of incoherent, impractical and inherently flawed, ill-thought policies.

This anti-politics combined with anti-Europeanism created a perfect storm for UKIP and they maximised benefit to them, aided and abetted by an increasingly eurosceptic Tory Party and an inherently right-wing media. It would be wrong, though, to suggest that their message, however superficial, didn’t resonate in some quarters with a voting public deeply frustrated by the failings of the current government and yet to be sufficiently convinced that ‘One Nation’ Labour are offering a strong enough alternative.

Bill Clinton’s eponymous, “It’s the economy, stupid!”, rings as true today as ever. Herein lies both a paradox for the Tories and an opportunity for Labour. The Conservatives of the last thirty years have retained a deliberate ambition to maintain high levels of unemployment and to limit trade union influence in order to keep wages low and to pacify the demands of workers, thus, as they see it, maximising profit, although this is ultimately self-defeating. For Labour, it should be an open goal, focusing on fair taxation, fair pay, investment in jobs and growth, including their jobs guarantee, should be music to the ears of struggling families – but swimming against the media tide to convince voters remains a tough challenge.

Whether it is by design (the Tories) or through insufficient impact (Labour) unless there is a more promising story to tell on the economy very soon we risk a growth of protest party politics that could push the UK toward a democratic train wreck that would render solutions to the economic and social challenges we face ever more unlikely.

Kevin Rowan
Head of Organisation and Services
TUC

© Trades Union Congress 2013

TUC

Demos against the Bedroom Tax – Tuesday 18th June – 6pm

We are calling on Bournemouth and Poole councils to give assurances that no social housing tenants will be evicted due to arrears accrued through the Bedroom Tax and will be holding demonstrations outside both town halls prior to full council meetings on Tuesday 18th June. Please show your support and assemble outside either Bournemouth Town Hall or Poole Civic Centre from 6pm. Thank-you

bedroom-tax-demo-flyer-front x500
Download flyer (pdf) A4A5

The Bedroom Tax – What it is and why it’s unfair

As part of the government’s Welfare Reform Act 2012, the Bedroom Tax came into effect in April 2013. It is also known as the spare room subsidy, social sector size criteria or under-occupation penalty. The changes mean that Housing Benefit will be cut for people who rent from a council or social landlord if they are considered to have a spare bedroom. Strictly speaking it is not a tax but that is the name it was given and it has stuck.

The Bedroom Tax is a cynical attack on the poorest in our society. Only those claiming benefits are affected. Anyone who lives in social housing but does not claim housing benefits will not have to pay any extra. This highlights that it is not about freeing up scarce social housing.

If a property is deemed as having spare bedrooms, the following applies:

  • One spare bedroom means you will lose 14% of your entitled housing benefit
  • Two or more spare bedrooms means you will lose 25% of your entitlement

According to Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) analysis, the average claimant will see their housing benefit cut by £14 / £16 per week although 7% of people will face a cut of £31.

The Bedroom Tax affects anyone of working age who rents from a council or social landlord, ie Housing Association, and is in receipt of Housing Benefit. There are a number of different rules about what counts as a spare bed room and what rooms will result in a reduction of Housing Benefit revenue:

  • Children of both sexes under 10 are expected to share a bedroom. If they currently do not share and they remain in separate rooms, one of their rooms is considered as a spare bedroom
  • Children of the same gender under 16 are expected to share a bedroom
  • Couples and adults are entitled to have bedrooms of their own
  • If a bedroom (with or without furniture) is kept free for when a child comes to stay with a parent that they do not normally live with, this room is considered as a spare bedroom
  • Bedroom Tax allowance for a child can only be claimed by one parent, even where they share access to the child
  • Extra bedrooms for medical reasons is not allowed and considered as a spare bedroom e.g. a couple using separate bedrooms because one of them is ill or recovering from an operation will be liable to the bedroom tax

Around 660,000 people will be effected and thousands of families and single people are at risk of losing their homes. Families will loose their neighbourhood, their community, children will have to change schools and teenagers will lose their friends. In Bournemouth and Poole, 1224 social housing tenants are affected by the bedroom tax.

It has been estimated that up to 420,000 of those affected are disabled or chronically sick. Many of these properties have been modified by social housing landlords to assist people in daily living and unless they can prove that they require ongoing overnight care, disabled tenants are trapped in a situation where they will have to pay more rent.. It is highly unlikely that people forced to move through financial difficulties, will find private landlords willing to spend money to modify properties.

The government claims that the Bedroom Tax will encourage more efficient use of social housing. However the reality is, not only are many people in need of their ‘extra’ rooms but, there are simply not enough one and two bedroom properties for those affected to move into. Across the country there are already 1 million people on council waiting lists for one bedroom properties.

The vast majority of those who are forced to ‘downsize’ will switch from social housing to the private rented sector which will inevitably lead to higher rent costs and local authorities paying out more in Housing Benefits. The solution to a lack of social housing is not to punish those who live in social housing but to build more council homes.

Please also see Some ideas to fight the bedroom tax

TUC Campaign Plan 2013: Five steps towards a future that works

TUC campaign to make case for radical economic reform
A jobs guarantee for young people, spreading the living wage across the public and private sectors, putting communities not profits at the heart of public services, and creating a stronger voice for workers in the management of companies are among the TUC’s five key campaign priorities in the run up to the general election, according to its campaign plan published on May 1st.

‘A Future That Works’ sets out five key priorities that will drive the work of the TUC over the next two years. The plan has been agreed by the General Council, which represents the TUC’s 53 affiliated unions who between them have almost six million members.

The campaign for jobs, growth and a new economy will mobilise resistance to austerity, with a series of events across the UK this summer, and will also provide a platform for advocates of pro-growth policies and new economic ideas. This will include an event with former US labour secretary and fierce critic of UK austerity, Robert Reich, who will deliver a lecture at the TUC on 21 May.

The TUC will work with and champion public and private sector employers who reach living wage agreements, as part of its campaign for fair pay and a living wage. The TUC itself became a living wage employer earlier this year.

Opposing the outsourcing and privatisation of public services will be the focus of good services and decent welfare. As well as the Save Our NHS campaign and the Action for Rail campaign to put the rail system back into public ownership, the TUC also plans to support parents and education unions against future attempts to allow state schools to be run for profit.

Having helped see off some of the government’s attacks on employment rights in the Beecroft report, the TUC will continue to press for respect and a voice at work for UK employees. The TUC aims to campaign to retain rights to paid holidays, a proper lunch break and reasonable hours at work that are under threat as the government attempts to repatriate powers back from the EU.

Finally, the TUC’s strong unions programme will train of a new generation of union reps to take the TUC campaign messages to non-unionised workers and workplaces and give a voice to a new generation of young employees.

TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady said: ‘Margaret Thatcher’s legacy of deregulated capitalism and the cult of finance crashed dramatically in 2008. But the government is still peddling the same old busted model.

‘The government’s failed austerity drive means it could take another ten painful years just to get back to where we were before the recession.

‘Not only will the TUC and unions continue to be the backbone of Britain’s anti-austerity movement but we will also lead the call for new economic ideas.

‘We will champion and work with those who are helping to create a fairer economy – from paying a living wage to giving staff a bigger say in how their company is run.

‘As well as a decent wage, people deserve decent public services. Having overseen the fragmentation of the NHS, ministers now want to introduce the profit motive into Britain’s schools. The TUC will fight this privatisation drive, which we know the public doesn’t support.

‘The TUC is not alone in wanting radical economic and social change. That’s why we’ll be calling on communities and campaign groups nationwide to join our campaign for a new economic settlement that involves and works for the whole country.

‘The next election is likely to be fought over the economy and our living standards crisis. We want to see decent jobs, fair pay, good services and a stronger voice at work at the heart of the plan to deal with these big economic challenges.’

TUC Campaign Plan 2013: Five steps towards a future that works

TUC Campaign Plan 2013: Five steps towards a future that works

Download the plan (pdf format 5.2MB)

Francesca Martinez on cuts and austerity at the People’s Assembly launch

Click here for more information about The People’s Assembly being held on Saturday 22 June 2013, 9:30am – 5pm at Central Hall Westminster, Storey’s Gate, London, Westminster, London SW1H 9NH.

Click here to sign the War on Welfare petition.

Click here to view Francesca’s full article “Hands off our Public Services” at Huffington Post UK.

Report of public meeting about proposed windfarms

A public meeting organised by Bournemouth Conservative councillors was held on 23rd March at The Royal Bath Hotel about the proposed offshore windfarms which would be situated 12 miles off Bournemouth beach. The following is a report of this meeting by local activist Stewart MacArthur

I attended the talk in Bournemouth yesterday. I think the session was introduced by Cllr Mike Green?

First in was Cllr Beesley who said Navitus/Eneco has not been transparent, open and treating people like children. The usual concerns that it’s a World Heritage Site and Tourism affected and that Eneco would only confirm the final design of turbines – post consent.

Andrew Langley from Challenge Navitus
Highlighted that area is a national asset already and the project deserves close scrutiny. Gave some stats…
Navitus is now on round 3 of the public consultation.
Britain’s big wind farm areas are in the North Sea and Irish Sea and are located outside a 12 mile Nautical Mile zone. Bournemouth (zone 7) proposed site is within the 12 Nautical Miles. He highlighted the size of Navitus windfarm area. If transposed onto a land map, the site stretches from Sandbanks Peninsula to Ringwood, to Verwood, to Wimborne back to Sandbanks.
Is half the size of the I.O.W.
Anything between 138 to 218 wind turbines.
Durlston has the most affected views.
Turbines are 2 and a half times the height of I.O.W.
Highlighted we live in World Heritage site. Eneco the Dutch state owned corp. all there 100MW turbines in Dutch seas are 12 miles off shore and all smaller than Navitus proposed site and show considerable less impact visually than Navitus Bay.

Ray Pointer from Poole & Christchurch Bay Association (PCBA)
Phase 3 of Navitus ends 5th April.
Phase 4. Autumn 2013
Planning application: Feb/March 2014
The Secretary of State’s decision will be in 2015.
Listed the concerns, visual impact, environment, sailing and navigation.
Highlighted on Navitus’s consultation brochure page25. That their turbine diagram was inaccurate. The stem of turbine was accurate but the wings of the turbines were not, and are in fact much bigger.
Stated that all European companies and wind farms do not allow farms inside of 12 miles.
Eneco may only create 100+ jobs.
And put forward the thoughts of existing views on visitors to Bournemouth, that a main draw to the resort was the unspoilt beautiful views, and comparing to what may be the view by 2023.
Various diagrams showing scale of turbines against known landmarks such as The Gherkin London, Salisbury Cathedral. Imax. Bus, and sail boat.

Mark Smith Director of Tourism Bournemouth
Tourism brings half a Billion to the area.
Creates 18,000 jobs.
Scotland has the most existing wind farms and therefore the most research stats.
1 in 9 people are put off by going to an area with windfarms.
18% actively avoid going to an area with windfarm.
Holland & Germany have fixed exclusion zones on their windfarms.
Windfarms affect business and property prices.
Dutch beach goers have uninterrupted views due to their exclusion zones.
Navitus have not provided the facts and took up to 15 months to receive info and when info was received, Navitus then only allowed 4 and a half days to evaluate.
People want an extension to the consultation programme, and do not want big business to dominate and steamrolled approach when proposing this site on the beauty of Bournemouth & area.
Then some concerns/questions were voiced by the public/Bournemouth residents
Navitus were asked for visualisations of the Night time view of the windfarm but have failed to produce but have pledged this by the next public consultation in Sept. 2013.
There was no proper debate. One single view from a consistent panel. That the South West Tourism figures show no real impact on the environment and there needs to be a general debate.
Concern about the noise
There is airborne noise & underwater noise, but no data at the moment. These issues never seem to be known in advance and should press for the data.
Drew comparisons with the size of the Imax and that the Dutch windfarms are on 10% the size of Navitus proposed site and turbines are half the size and further out.

Dorset Friends of the Earth
No balance to the discussion.
What about the Bournemouth & Poole Renewables incentive, to make 15% of energy from renewables by 2020?
Cllr Beesley: Are following Government guidelines, is getting updates this afternoon and we are not ignoring those concerns.
We must encourage renewables, but also must respect the local environment.

Terrorist Threat
Will we in 55 years time realise that the only safe alternative for Dorset is Nuclear Power.

Night Views
Eneco don’t seem to think night views were important, hotels worried that night views over bay, the assets of these views will be compromised.

Connor Burns and Robert Syms and Richard Drax have been active in Westminster concerning Navitus.
They have asked Eneco a simple question…
How many, where, how tall, what do they look like?
We are none the wiser and no better informed.
The decision is down to the Secretary of State and will be the biggest decision facing Bournemouth in 25 years.
Get involved, respond to MPs and Navitus.

Approx 380 people attended.

My opinion: Complete propaganda and gave NO voice to opposition, the only voice was from a public question from A local Greenpeace rep. (Andrea?) and one young man who got an irate response from Connor Burns. No depth to anything the councillors said, just listing off words, like “environmental concerns” but not willing to address in any depth what those concerns are. The biggest applause came to a public statement that in “55 years we will look back and wonder why we didn’t propose nuclear…unless we come to our senses.”…which was somewhat worrying. I also had fun by staring intently and menacingly at Beesley, Burns, Kelsey from the stairway like DeNiro in Taxi Driver ….but that’s just personal.

Week of Action against Workfare

Over 3 days of events, hundreds of leaflets were handed out to people. Day 1 consisted of protestors outside Abilities in Poole (a provider of the govt’s Work Programme), then Poole Jobcentre, the High Street and later in the afternoon Prospects (another provider of the Work programme. On day 2 the protests moved to Bournemouth outside another Prospects office and then the Jobcentre. The 3rd and final (rainy) day was held outside The College in Poole due to their close association with Working Links a major national provider of the Work Programme which uses unpaid work placements. See also “anti workfare activists target Bournemouth and Poole College – Demotix” During the 3 days of action, a few songs were sung and hopefully a lot of awareness was raised with moments of humour especially a senior College official demanding “get of my land”!!!

A massive thank-you to all who helped and supported these events

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The action continues… via Boycott Workfare

Earlier this week Superdrug announced they would be pulling out of workfare schemes and the promise of demos taking place across the UK this Saturday must have helped! Unfortunately other high street chains are still profiting from unpaid work. What we are doing works! We are winning so let’s keep it up and let more businesses know workfare is wrong! Please contact the following companies today. If you’d like to use a standard letter, there’s one here. For more details about high street retailers using workfare – click here

Retailers like to claim these schemes are voluntary. One thing needs to be clear: the Work Experience scheme they refer to is not free of sanctions. It is workfare. Bullying and pressure from the Job Centre often coerces us into supposedly “voluntary” actions. We are rarely told that we have a right to choose whether to attend. Now that sanctions can escalate to three years, getting it wrong is not a risk many of us can afford to take.

Soon after the changes last year, the Guardian exposed that people who refused Work Experience were being sent on Mandatory Work Activity for standing up for their rights. Work Experience is only “voluntary” until you refuse.

Five things the government won’t tell you about Workfare via Left Foot Forward

1) Mandatory Work Activity doesn’t improve job outcomes but it does increase disability claims. According to a study published last June, it has no impact on employment and may even lead to those on the programme moving from Jobseekers’ Allowance to Employment and Support Allowance instead.

2) The Work Programme actively reduces the chances of people finding a job. Figures released by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) showed that just 3.6 per cent of people on the work programme had found work on the work programme, below the contractual minimum of 5.5 per cent.

3) The Community Action Programme has no impact on how many people find work. Under this six month workfare placement, just 15-18 per cent of people found work – roughly the same percentage as those receiving standard JobCentre Plus support.

4) The rate of people on the Work Experience Scheme leaving benefits is the same as it is for people not on the scheme (see graph below). To quote the Center For Economic and Social Inclusion: “This [graph] appears to show that the youth work experience scheme has had no additional impact on the speed at which young people leave benefit, and may have actually led to them spending longer on benefit than they would have done. However, these figures require some caution – the stated intent of the Department has been to target work experience at those with the biggest barriers to work, who would likely have had rates below the average for all claimants.”
work programme graph

5) Workfare schemes haven’t helped people into work when the schemes have been tried in other countries. As the DWP noted in 2008: “There is little evidence that workfare increases the likelihood of finding work. It can even reduce employment chances by limiting the time available for job search and by failing to provide the skills and experience valued by employers.”

end unpaid single stick no border temp

The Ticking Time Bomb of Child Poverty and Austerity

The UK is the sixth richest country in the world and yet more than one in four children is growing up in poverty today.

  • Child poverty damages childhoods. Growing up in poverty means being cold, going hungry, not owning belongings that others consider essential and not being able to join in activities with friends. It also impacts on health, educational outcomes and the overall experience of childhood.
  • Child poverty destroys life chances. Leaving school with few qualifications translates into lower earnings over the course of a working life. Poorer childhood health results in more complicated health histories over the course of a lifetime, again influencing earnings as well as overall life quality.
  • Child poverty imposes costs on broader society. Governments forgo prospective revenues and commit themselves to providing services in the future if they fail to address child poverty now.

Cross-national studies and evidence gathered over time show us that child poverty is not a natural phenomenon. Instead it is a political phenomenon – the product of choices and actions made by government and society.

Child Poverty damages children’s experiences of childhood and harms their future life chances. Research by Save the Children earlier this year highlights:

  • well over half of parents in poverty (61%) say they have cut back on food and over a quarter (26%) say they have skipped meals in the past year.
  • around 1 in 5 parents in poverty (19%) say their children have to go without new shoes when they need them.
  • a large number of children in poverty say they are missing out on things that many other children take for granted, such as going on school trips (19%) and having a warm coat in winter (14%).
  • only 1 in 5 parents in poverty (20%) say they have not had to borrow money to pay for essentials, such as food and clothes, in the past year.

A recent study by the Institute of Fiscal Studies (IFS) estimates that 800,000 more children will fall into poverty by 2020. That would be a rise in the child poverty rate from 19.9% to 24.4%. This will be the biggest increase in child poverty since the 1980’s, and would completely reverse the improvements made by during the last decade when 900,000 children were removed from poverty. The IFS figures are for children living in absolute poverty. Millions more children live in relative poverty.

As the govt’s spending cuts continue, so more and more families are at real risk of slipping into poverty, either from a reduction in tax credits, child benefit, the decision to uprate benefits in line with the consumer prices index rather than the retail prices index (which tends to show a higher annual inflation rate), the time limiting of employment and support allowance or from the loss of their jobs or stagnating wages. Poverty affects every aspect of a child’s life. 47% of children with asthma are from the poorest 10% of families, poor children are 5 times less likely to have access to a safe outdoor play area, 85% of children living in damp flats have breathing problems.

Austerity measures may also affect children in more subtle ways. There is another type of poverty, one that is more difficult to define and quantify, that of emotional poverty. As the unemployment rate soars, many households are experiencing joblessness for the first time. Children are far from immune from the negative effects of austerity. The additional stress levels, lack of funds and general loss of confidence experienced by parents and family members must impact upon children also. It has been proven that unemployment can become cyclical for generations of families. These children are feeling both the direct and indirect outcomes of unemployment and austerity measures likely affecting their own participation in the workplace in future years.

Children’s charity Unicef has published a report highlighting that child poverty rates within the UK are set to increase significantly, due to government spending cuts. There is recognition that child poverty is one of the most crucial indicators for measuring successful social cohesion, a marker of wellbeing and future prosperity of any given nation. Long-term effects of child poverty include: issues in education, employment, mental and physical health problems and difficulties with social interaction. The standard of living encountered during a person’s childhood is recognized as being instrumental in shaping their future.

Unicef warns that during times of economic recession, children can “drop off the policy agenda” in the scramble to effect immediate change, all planning for future generations is perceived as of secondary importance. This is highly problematic, not only because future planning is negated in favour of a short term outlook, but because a child’s current living situation is under escalated risk during times of financial crisis. Children, as one of the most vulnerable groups of people, cannot be left out of the equation especially in times of financial recession.

This government has proposed changes to child benefit; however, major inconsistencies regarding financial eligibility led to strong opposition and initial proposals were re-drafted highlighting the governments’ incompetence in making basic calculations. The Child Poverty Action Group has already warned that the proposed cuts to child benefit will have an adverse effect on children’s wellbeing. They questioned the moral issue of using children as a battlefield for austerity.

Austerity measures are proving a complete failure, exacerbating the problems of unemployment and thereby increasing levels of child poverty. State-direction job creation, along with relevant supporting policies, is the route to success in lowering the rate of child poverty in the UK. The ‘Lost Generation’ will not just be those currently leaving school to no jobs and no higher and further education places, but the generation before them who are too young to be aware of their disappearing future. To put the brakes on this depressing picture we need to end the madness of austerity Britain. The Children’s Society have said: “It would be a grave injustice if we allowed the burden of the current economic turmoil to fall on the shoulders of disadvantaged children.”

Child Poverty in Britain, £10 Billion To Be Cut From Welfare (RT news report Oct 2012)

End Child Poverty, a coalition of more than 150 charities, welfare organisations, social justice groups and unions has published a report and interactive map detailing the level of child poverty in each constituency, local authority and ward in the UK. The campaign predicts that, as benefits start to fall in real terms later this year, the proportion of children living in poverty will increase significantly.

Commenting on the figures, Enver Solomon, Chair of the End Child Poverty campaign said:

“The child poverty map reveals the depth and breadth of child poverty across the country showing the gross levels of inequality that children face in every region. Far too many children whose parents are struggling to make a living have to go hungry and miss out on the essentials of a decent childhood that all young people should be entitled to.

The huge disparities that exist across the country have become more entrenched and are now an enduring reality as many more children are set to become trapped in long term poverty and disadvantage.

Local authorities have to deal with reduced budgets but they have critical decisions to make. We’re calling on authorities to prioritise low income families in the decisions they make about local welfare spending, including spending on the new council tax benefit, and on protecting families hit by the bedroom tax. This week we have written to local authority leaders in the local authorities with the most child poverty, asking them what they will do to tackle child poverty in their local area.”

The government must also closely examine its current strategy for reducing poverty and consider what more it could do to ensure millions of children’s lives are not blighted by the corrosive impact that poverty has on their daily existence.’’

cpag dorset

Within the local Boroughs in our area, there is a very contrasting picture from ward to ward. In Bournemouth, 33% of children within Kinson South are living in poverty whilst in Littledown and Iford the figure is 8%. In the Poole Town ward, within Alderney it is 30% whilst in Broadstone it is below 5%. Click here for the full percentage breakdown for all wards within Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch. Excel spreadsheets detailing percentage figures for all South West local authorities can be viewed and downloaded by clicking here.

From April 2013, local authorities will have significantly increased discretion over the allocation of financial support for families, although in circumstances in which this support has been dramatically reduced. Local Authorities will be responsible for:

  • Providing support with the cost of essential items such as replacing cookers or fridges for families on a low income, as the Social Fund is replaced by schemes run by local authorities.
  • Deciding who receives help with paying Council Tax, as Council Tax Benefit is replaced with local assistance schemes. The Resolution Foundation has found that low income families will see their council tax rise by up to £600 a year as a result of this change.
  • Deciding who should receive support with housing costs. April 2013 will see the introduction of the £500 a week benefit cap and the bedroom tax for families who live in social housing if the government believes they have a spare bedroom.
  • Local Authorities have been allocated control over Discretionary Housing Payments, which they can use to help make up rent shortfalls for a small proportion of families affected by these changes.

End Child Poverty believes that Local Authorities should take a strategic decision to protect the poorest families with children when allocating these resources. Local Authorities have not imposed these cuts but, with the removal of ringfencing, they will have a significant influence over how they affect local residents.

If you would like to become involved in BPACC campaigns about this issue or any other, please Contact Us by email to info@bpacc.co.uk

Sources:
End Child Poverty Report – Child Poverty Map of the UK
Child Poverty in the UK – CPAG
Child poverty: a generation sacrificed to austerity – Counterfire
Austerity increases child poverty, report confirms – ISG
UK’s Poorest Families hit Hardest by Recession and Austerity – The Real News
Poverty map shows how cuts in benefits will hurt children – Guardian